Man Discovers Nail in Head, 2005

Patrick Lawler seemed fine after a small accident at work. What seemed at first to be a lousy toothache turned into needing emergency surgery after a stunning X-ray find. Read to find out what happened.

The 23-year-old construction worker, with black eyebrows and goatee, sat on the edge of his chair and gnawed on his fingernails with the sort of trepidation familiar to many in his situation – he was sitting in the dentist’s waiting room.

Like so many Americans the lack of medical insurance meant that a visit to the dentist could solve a medical problem but replace it with a financial one, so Patrick Lawler was reluctant to sit in the chair for just a toothache. Even so there was swelling which no amount of painkillers or ice cream would soothe. And then there was the blurry vision; for six days now, since a day’s work at a ski lodge, the pain endured.

Lawler’s wife worked at the surgery so when Lawler shook his dentist’s hand in greeting, it was the warm greeting of friends. They proceeded with an X-ray. Then his dentist returned with the findings. Lawler was so shocked he was sure that the professional, being the friend he was, was goofing around. Yet there was no sign of a smirk to betray that; he was deadly serious. ‘There’s a nail in your head!’ he announced.

Dumbstruck, the murk of the mystery then cleared for Lawler as he recalled that day at the ski lodge; he had been using a nail gun which backfired. It had shot a nail into a wood piece nearby but what Lawler had astonishingly failed to notice was a second nail had actually punched into his upper mouth.

How the young man failed to detect a piece of metal burrow into his head is beyond belief. Lawler was rushed to hospital and underwent a four-hour surgery to remove a whopping 4 inch (10.2cm) nail, an inch and a half of that piercing his brain. By extreme fluke the nail caused no damage to his mental faculties. Lawler’s surgeon quipped “If you’re going to have a nail in the brain, that’s the way you want it to be. He’s the luckiest guy ever.

(storypick.com)

If you can believe it this isn’t the only time a man has unwittingly fired a nail into his head, so beware, if you’re into DIY and some mystery pain ever flares up in your skull, it just could be you have a nail in your head.

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The Business Plot, 1933

A credibly true conspiracy story: The aim was to take over Washington DC in a military coup; there was just one man standing in their way. Read how one veteran US Marine General stood up to the political forces that lurk in the shadows even today.

It was November the 24th, 1934 and retired General Smedley Butler sat before a closed session of the Congressional Special Committee on Un-American Activities in New York.

This man had served in numerous military operations around the world, including WW1. With two Medals of Honour to his name, he was America’s most decorated soldier and his reputation was above reproach. However news outlets, such as the New York Times, dismissed his story as a “giant hoax” the moment it came out.

Prefacing his remarks by saying “I have one interest in all of this, and that is to try to do my best to see that a democracy is maintained in this country.” Butler then gave an incredible testimony that Gerald C. MacGuire attempted to recruit him to lead a coup, promising him an army of 500,000 men for a march on Washington, DC, and financial backing.

The pretext for the coup would be that the president’s health was failing. Butler said the plotters felt his good reputation and popularity were vital in attracting support amongst the general public and saw him as easier to manipulate than others.

Given a successful coup, Butler said that the plan was for him to have held near-absolute power in the newly created position of ‘Secretary of General Affairs’, while Roosevelt would have assumed a figurehead role.

General Smedley Butler was to lead a fascist coup of the USA if ‘hidden interests’ had their way (blurryphotos.org)

Those implicated in the plot by Butler all denied any involvement. MacGuire was the only figure identified by Butler who testified before the committee.

Others Butler accused were not called to appear to testify because the “committee has had no evidence before it that would in the slightest degree warrant calling before it such men”.

While historians have questioned whether or not a coup was actually close to execution, most agree that some sort of plot was contemplated and discussed. 

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Napoleon’s ‘Battle’ with Bunnies, 1807

Of all of Bonaparte’s illustrious battles perhaps the one he wanted to forget as quickly as possible was not his worst ever defeat, but his most embarrassing one, when Napoleon fled from a horde of rabbits.

History tells us that Napoleon Bonaparte’s worst ever defeat occurred at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, yet perhaps his most humiliating one was eight years earlier. It was the summer of 1807 and Napoleon Bonaparte was in high spirits as he sauntered across a meadow accompanied by beaters and gun-bearers.

He was at the zenith of his powers having subdued, and made peace with, France’s two arch enemies, Prussia and Russia by signing the Treaties of Tilsit. Now was the time to relax and bask in his glory and so a rabbit shoot and outdoor luncheon were arranged with France’s top brass invited. Around the meadow a ring of rabbit cages had been laid out and hundreds, perhaps up to 3000 rabbits, were released. The hunt was on.

But something strange happened; instead of bounding away, the horde of fluffy ears charged at Napoleon. He and his men laughed it up at first but the onslaught continued and they swarmed over the man and began to climb up his leg.

France’s all-conquering general was no match for an army of bunnies. (aminoapps.com)

Napoleon tried shooing them with his riding crop; his men grabbed sticks and tried chasing them away; This was quickly degenerating into a demeaning farce for a great emperor such as himself, and so Napoleon retreated to his coach. But the rabbit horde divided into two wings and poured around the flanks of the party to surround the imperial coach, some even leaping into the carriage.

The attack ceased only as the coach rolled away. The man who was dominating Europe was no match for an army of bunnies.

Fortune Cookie Reveals Winning Lottery Numbers, 2005

Read about the reaction when, in Iowa 2005, fortune cookie lucky numbers caused 25 times more players to win the state lottery than anticipated.

You know how at the end of a Chinese restaurant meal you get a little fortune cookie to crack open with some lucky numbers and wise words of oriental counsel inside?

Surely those lucky numbers couldn’t be so lucky as to win you the lottery? But this actually happened to dozens of state lottery players in Iowa, 2005.

In one of the mid-week ‘Powerball’ draws the expected number of Level 5 Prize-winning tickets – $100,000 or $500,000 prizes – was 4.

State Lottery Directors were absolutely flummoxed to find out that this time there were a whopping 110 winners, and most had apparently used the numbers included in a fortune-cookie message.

Doug Orr, Powerball Marketing Director reported “With the systems reporting so many plays of 22–28–32–33–39 and Powerball 40, it is likely that most drew their luck from a very fortunate cookie. The cookie was one number away from winning the $25.5 million jackpot.

The odds of winning the $100,000 prize were about 1 in 2.9 million, yet the seers at the cookie factory smashed those odds.

They no doubt garnered a lot of fans of their cookies and sure made it a very expensive week for the good people of the Multi-State Lottery Association too.

There were 110 winners of the Iowa State Lottery in 2005 – up from the expected 4 (snopes.com)

Boston’s Great Molasses Flood, 1919

Boston was hit by one of the weirdest disasters ever heard of, when the city docksides were deluged by a wave of sticky molasses. Read about the suffering it inflicted and how the city’s streets reeked for years after.

Molasses (Black Treacle) is a thick, heavy substance refined from sugar cane. In Boston, 1919, the Purity Distilling Company used it to ferment ethanol, the stuff used to manufacture alcohol and even munitions at the time.

Shipments were stored in a giant tank on the harbourside which stood 15 m (50 ft) tall by 27 m (90 ft) in diameter and contained as much as 8,700,000L (2,300,000 US gal). At midday in mid-January, possibly due to thermal heating, the stored liquid expanded and the huge container burst open and collapsed.

Witnesses reported that they felt the ground shake and heard a roar, a long rumble similar to the passing of an elevated train; others reported a tremendous crashing, a deep growling, “a thunderclap-like bang!”, and a machine gun-like sound as the rivets shot out of the tank.

The liquid is much heavier than water and so was extremely destructive as a wave smashed and sploshed across the harbour, 8 m (25 ft) high at its peak and moving at 35 mph (56 km/h). Several blocks around were flooded.

The Boston Post reported: “Molasses, waist deep, covered the street and swirled and bubbled about the wreckage… Here and there struggled a form — whether it was animal or human being was impossible to tell. Only an upheaval, a thrashing about in the sticky mass, showed where any life was… Horses died like so many flies on sticky fly-paper. The more they struggled, the deeper in the mess they were ensnared. Human beings — men and women — suffered likewise.

The thick, heavy wave of molasses devastated Boston’s harbourside (bostonglobe.com)

21 people and several horses died, and over a hundred more people were injured. The clean-up took weeks. The event passed into folklore and for years afterwards the streets still reeked sickly sweet on hot Summers’ days.

Sawney Bean’s Cannibal Clan, 16th Century

A tale hard to distinguish fact from fiction, yet there is undoubtedly some truth behind Sawney Bean and his massive family of incestuous cannibals who may have devoured hundreds over the decades and terrorised the locals. Read on to discover his terrible fate.

The tale of Sawney Bean is a gruesome tale from Scottish history.

The man was born in the 16th Century and fathered by a ditch digger but quickly gave up on following in his father’s footsteps. Marrying a like-minded woman named “Black” Agnes Douglas, together they became a couple of real savages.

Incredible though it sounds, they went on to head an incestuous family of 45 cannibals.

They started out as simple robbers and made a home in a deep cave on the coastline. Its entrance would flood at high tide which explains how they lived undiscovered for the next 25 years. The two quickly turned to eating their victims whose discarded possessions began to quickly pile up amongst dismembered limbs, bones and flesh. Their eight sons and six daughters grew up feral, and bred like rabbits, their numbers multiplying until they were more of a warband than family.

They would ambush locals as they travelled between nearby settlements, their numbers quickly overwhelming their prey before they could escape or defend themselves. The steadily growing tally of missing did not go unnoticed but the Bean clan stayed well hidden, only coming out at night.

Their luck eventually changed. Riding back from a fayre nearby, a couple on horseback got ambushed. The young wife was quickly unhorsed and disembowelled as the husband fought desperately for his life. He was a skilled duellist, however, and deftly fought off the savages with sword and pistol before a large party of fayre goers arrived on the scene.

For once outnumbered, the fiends fled back to their cave, this time leaving behind witnesses and a very vengeful husband.

The locals went at once to Edinburgh to report to the King of Scotland himself no less, James VI. Hearing the terrors this family had committed, he personally led a small army of 400 men with several tracker dogs and finally discovered the cave entrance.

The King’s soldiers discover the Bean clan’s gruesome sanctuary (artstation.com)

Horrified by the gory sight inside, they subdued the family, taking them back to the capital to devise a suitable fate for such heinous people.

The entire family was executed. The males first were dismembered like their victims as the women were made to look on and then the females were burned at the stake. And so passed into lore the story of the Sawney Bean Family.

R. Christian’s Enigmatic Stones, 1980

When a man commissioned a strange structure to be built on behalf of a mysterious group, it left stone masons scratching their heads. Find out what was inscribed on it and why it was the subject of numerous conspiracy theories.

In June 1979, a man using the pseudonym Robert C. Christian approached the Elberton Granite Finishing Company on behalf of “a small group of loyal Americans” which intended to remain anonymous and commissioned a structure.

Christian delivered a scale model of what he wanted with ten pages of specifications. He explained that it would function as a compass, calendar and clock, and should be capable of withstanding catastrophic events.

Joe Fendley of Elberton Granite assumed that Christian was a ‘nut’ and attempted to discourage him by giving a quote several times higher than any project the company had taken, explaining that the Guidestones would require additional tools and consultants, but Christian happily accepted the quote.

The finished product was unveiled on March 22, 1980.

That structure was called the Georgia Guidestones, a granite monument in Elbert County, Georgia, in the United States. It was carefully crafted with astronomical features with the four outer stones being oriented to mark the limits of the 18.6-year lunar declination cycle, for example.

A set of ten guidelines was also inscribed on the structure in eight modern languages:

  1. Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature.
  2. Guide reproduction wisely — improving fitness and diversity.
  3. Unite humanity with a living new language.
  4. Rule passion — faith — tradition — and all things with tempered reason.
  5. Protect people and nations with fair laws and just courts.
  6. Let all nations rule internally resolving external disputes in a world court.
  7. Avoid petty laws and useless officials.
  8. Balance personal rights with social duties.
  9. Prize truth — beauty — love — seeking harmony with the infinite.
  10. Be not a cancer on the earth — Leave room for nature — Leave room for nature.
The Guidestones seemed to advocate population control, eugenics, and internationalism (wired.com)

The fact that the Guidestones’ authors remain anonymous and they apparently advocated population control, eugenics, and internationalism has made them a target for controversy and are frequently referred to by alternative-narrativists.

In mid-2022, someone attempted to demolish the structure with explosives, destroying one of the pillars. The remaining structure was demolished by state authorities for safety reasons as an awareness in the West of the Globalists’ conspiracy continues to blossom.

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When England’s Queen Met a Pirate Queen, 1593

What kind of pirate would sail to London to parley with her arch nemesis, the Queen of England? Her name was Grace O’Malley, she was Irish and a queen in her own right

In the 16th Century, whilst Ireland’s eastern coastline was controlled by the English, its hinterland to the west was frontier country.

On the wild Atlantic coast, where great rollers pounded the raw, verdant coastline, the Uí Mháille noble family held sway over the pasturelands there and surrounding seas. Into this family Gráinne Ní Mháille (Grace O’Malley in English) was born.

A woman whose name is shrouded in legend, Grace O’Malley grew up to become the matriarch of her clan and followed in her family’s footsteps. The O’Malleys drew power by ‘taxing’ passing ships — a euphemism for piracy — and fighting rival clans, and Grace led from the front.

Yet this was a time when the English were a growing force to be reckoned with; the great English Queen Elizabeth I sat on the throne and she was tightening her grip on the ‘Emerald Isle’.

(takebackhalloween.org)

Elizabeth I’s man in Ireland Sir Richard Bingham was more than a match for O’Malley. As Governor of Connaught Sir Richard squeezed O’Malley’s domain so much that by 1593 he had captured her two sons, Tibbot Burke and Murrough O’Flaherty, and half-brother Dónal na Píopa.

O’Malley was reduced to desperate straits. What could she do?

She certainly wasn’t going to just give up. O’Malley was going to attempt something so audacious it might just win the Queen of England’s respect and therefore clemency.

This was risky to say the least; they were political enemies and cages hung from the Tower of London with rotting corpses in them, testament to the usual fate of pirates. Yet the Queen agreed to meet O’Malley in London so she could plead her case.

The two women were the most powerful in the British Isles. Despite being opposed in many ways they had much in common.

They were both courageous and charismatic leaders; Queen Elizabeth had earned huge respect for leading her nation to defeat the mighty Spanish Armada in 1588 and O’Malley has been described as a fearless leader and able negotiator, not to mention other less salubrious credentials.

O’Malley’s black sailed ship entered the Thames estuary and sailed upstream to Greenwich Palace where it docked.

The lady was then searched and the queen’s guards found something on her… it was a dagger!

The Queen’s henchmen were furious; it was bad enough their queen was meeting with a brigand, yet O’Malley explained it was for her own protection and the queen accepted this.

O’Malley was brought into the queen’s presence surrounded by Her Majesty’s guards and courtiers, wearing a dress rumoured so fine it drew not a few admiring glances.

They greeted each other as queens, if not equals. O’Malley declined to curtsey, and when the Irish Lady sneezed and was given an embroidered handkerchief she infuriated the courtiers even more by using it then throwing it on the crackling fire.

Yet, Elizabeth was intrigued by the woman. The two conversed in Latin and Elizabeth I warmed to Grace as she regaled the English queen with tales of her daring exploits and grievances towards Sir Bingham. The only thing now was would Elizabeth let a perennial nemesis of hers just sail off after coming into her clutches?

She did. O’Malley’s gamble paid off. As the serious troublemaker to the English which she had been, she entered the lion’s den and left with not only her life and liberty intact but her son Tibbot released.

Sir Bingham would continue to make her life difficult though. The two feminist icons of their age would both pass away in 1603.

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The Rainstorm That Went Splat, 1994

Residents of Oakville were flummoxed by a downpour of goo they experienced in 1994. What was even more disconcerting was the wave of illness that rippled throughout the community immediately after…

With the sight of undulating woodland resembling the serried ranks of a million upright matchsticks covered in a fuzzy green blanket of needles to the north and the sound of the wily Chehalis River babbling by to the south, Oakland in Washington State is the kind of all-wooden, spread-eagled town American frontier folk, accustomed to all the wilderness they want, like to call home.

On August the 7th, 1994 there was no indication that the coming day would be unlike any other.

Oakland is rinsed by mountain rains year-round so, for the few awake at 3 am, the rhythm of precipitation was familiar. Yet, any awake in bed would have strained breathlessly to scrutinise an alien sound; not a patter of raindrops on bedroom windows but rather a queer, dull splattering. What on earth could it be?

A cop and his friend on the graveyard shift were cruising the area in his patrol car. They were caught under the heavy deluge and left open mouthed as a translucent, soupy liquid was smeared across the windscreen by the wipers.

We both looked at each other and we said, ‘Jeez, this isn’t right. I mean, we’re out in the middle of nowhere, basically, and where did this come from?’”

They pulled over under shelter and the cop took a closer look at what had just gunged his car.

The substance was very mushy. It’s almost as if you had Jell-O in your hand… We did have some bells go off in our heads that basically said that this isn’t right, this isn’t normal.

The rain had covered an area of 20mi² (32 km²)

The puzzle deepened. People soon began to turn nauseous and dizzy. Pets dropped dead and Officer Lacey was finding it hard to breathe by the day’s end. Most of the residents were reportedly struck down with a mystery virus which lasted up to three months. Was the mystery rain of goo and sickness coincidence? Surely not.

Questions about the gelatin’s origin remain open. Lab tests on the substance were inconclusive; human white blood cells and two types of bacteria were found but the theory that it was human waste dumped from overflying airliners was discounted. Another idea that the goo is caused by a phenomenon called Star Jelly is… peculiar, to say the least.

Some residents recalled the drone of slow, black military aircraft over the town around the time but the Airforce denies involvement.

Shockingly, the official government reports of the event are no more.

(newspapers.com)
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Armoured Bulldozer Rampage, 2004

The story of the man who built himself an armoured bulldozer to attack and destroy his town has since passed into legend. But was Marvin Heemeyer just a spite filled brute, or a symbol of the ‘little guy’ perennially oppressed by corporate power?

A man by the name of Marvin Heemeyer sat in his Komatsu D355A Bulldozer as he used his workshop crane to lower twelve tonnes of composite armour on top of him, effectively entombing himself. With the fate he had decided for himself however, he wasn’t concerned.

This was the culmination of an 18 month project to build himself a ‘Killdozer’; a behemoth complete with gun ports (for three rifles), cameras and air-conditioning. Heemeyer’s plan was to treat the town of Granby, USA to a destructive rampage in revenge for a series of injustices he felt he had suffered.

So, what had led Heemeyer to this moment?

‘Marv’, a man described by many as ‘likeable’ and ‘affable’, had bought some land in Granby for $48,000 in 1992 to build an air muffler workshop. Later he agreed to sell his land to a Mr Cody Docheff for $250,000, but changed his mind. Why, is unclear but he then demanded $375,000 before raising the price again to $1,000,000, pricing himself out of a deal that would help facilitate the construction of a concrete factory next to his business.

In 2001, local authorities approved the construction of the concrete factory anyway.

Heemeyer attempted to appeal the decision but was unsuccessful. It was claimed by Heemeyer that the construction blocked access to the shop. He was also fined $2,500 for various violations, including “not being hooked up to the sewer line” When he mailed in the cheque, it included a note with “Cowards” scrawled on it. Clearly, Heemeyer was pissed.

I was always willing to be reasonable until I had to be unreasonable”, he wrote. “Sometimes reasonable men must do unreasonable things.

On June the 4th, 2004, Heemeyer was ready. He smashed his Killdozer through his workshop wall and, predictably, lumbered towards his first target, the concrete factory. Over the next two hours, police tried to stop him but the Killdozer’s armour was impervious to anything they could throw at it, including gunfire, explosives and stun grenades thrown down its exhaust chute. It was all the cops could do to keep everyone out of Heemeyer’s destructive path.

Helicopter footage of Heeymeyer’s Killdozer rampage (youtube.com)

In the end, Heemeyer’s trail of destruction was halted when his armoured brute fell into the cellar of a hardware store he’d demolished. Unable to get out, and unwilling to go to jail, cops heard a solitary gunshot go off inside the Killdozer.

Heemeyer had damaged thirteen buildings, including the town hall and caused $7,000,000 worth of damage.

Heemeyer’s legacy is controversial; for some he is remembered as a folk hero, who stood up to ‘the man’ that had tried to bully him in the interests of big business and point out that Heemeyer avoided killing anyone. Yet for others he was a terrorist and the fact there were no casualties was more by luck than design.

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